RPC-847

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Registered Phenomena Code: 847

Object Class: Alpha-White

Hazard Types: Mechanical, Grouped, Temporal? [17/04/2017:] Visual, Mind Control?


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RPC-847 recovery operations, 07/07/2016

Containment Protocols: Routine surface and submarine recovery sessions for instances of RPC-847-A and -B will be conducted once every month by MST Zulu-43 ("Deep Ones") along the east coast of Africa and Madagascar, as well as Yemen and Oman. Resulting instances are to be shipped to OL-Site-847 for their disposal or storage: unique instances will be stored, while repeating ones will be disposed of via incineration or recycled.

As of now, a method to reliably identify non-mechanical RPC-847-A is not available: they may be tentatively identified via proximity to other instances and examined further before disposal or storage.

[UPDATE 17/04/2017:] RPC-847-A AND -B ARE NOW BELIEVED TO BE HAZARDOUS. MST ZULU-43 OPERATIVES MUST DISPOSE OF -B INSTANCES ON SIGHT. -A INSTANCES MAY BE STORED AT AN UNDISCLOSED LOCATION.


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MH370

Description: RPC-847 refers to the repeated recovery of marine debris associated with Malaysia Airlines Flight 370 (MH370), an international passenger flight with which contact was lost while passing over the South China Sea during March 2014. Individual pieces of debris are collectively designated RPC-847-A, and display no anomalous properties.

International search efforts following the loss of MH370 are publically known to have recovered a total of 20 pieces of debris along the Indian Ocean, approximately 4,000km west of the initial search area, with locations including the island of Réunion, Tanzania, Madagascar, South Africa and Mozambique. This is untrue: before Authority involvement in late 2015, approximately 670 objects were recovered between the aforementioned locations, Oman, Yemen and India.

Of these original 670 instances, only 390 were positively identified as linked to MH370, with a further 110 potential matches and 170 remaining unconfirmed. Numerous objects in this set were identified as Boeing-777 parts verified to belong to MH370: 23 identical port flaps, 16 engine cowling plates, 33 horizontal stabilizers and 5 starboard flaperons were included in this subset, greatly exceeding the amount of parts included in any Boeing 777 variant.

Marine debris recovery operations were seized by the Authority in December of 2015 once it became evident that a large portion of discovered debris was likely anomalous in origin. Since then, an additional 3000 instances of RPC-847-A have been retrieved by the Authority at a rate of more than 600 per year. [Last Updated: 06/04/2018]

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RPC-847-A Instance. [TEMPORARILY REMOVED: SEE DOCUMENT #477-847a]

[Update, 07/07/2016:] Human remains discovered near the usual locations where RPC-847-A are retrieved have been genetically linked with passengers of MH370 and designated RPC-847-B. These remains are in varying degrees of decomposition and integrity; severed arms, bones and entire corpses as new as three weeks and as old as nine months have all been designated RPC-847-B.

Most instances appear to be either severed or decomposed enough to have separated from the rest of the body, occasionally showing other signs of damage, such as crushing and second to third-degree burns. Identification of RPC-847-B relies on genetic profiling, rendering it partially ineffective: certain MH370 passengers are not known to have extant genetic profiles.

Similarly to RPC-847-A, numerous instances of RPC-847-B corresponding to the same body parts have been genetically linked to identical individuals; 186 out of 227 missing passengers have RPC-847-B matches. No flight officers are yet known to have corresponding RPC-847-B instances.

Total instances of RPC-847-B in the possession of the Authority number 380. [Last Updated: 06/04/2018]

[Update, 09/02/2017:] During routine RPC-847-A and -B retrieval operations on the coast of Tanzania, a complete instance of RPC-847-B washed ashore, covered in ragged clothing that helped identify it as a flight officer. This instance, designated RPC-847-B1 for its unusual characteristics, has been identified to be First Officer Fariq Abdul Hamid.

Postmortem screening of RPC-847-B1 revealed abnormally high levels of glucose in blood, allowing for extended preservation of bodily chemicals. Further analysis points toward extreme amounts of stress before death: catecholamine, troponin and cortisol have been found in similarly high amounts, exceeding the indicative average by 200%.

It is believed that RPC-847-B1 was deceased approximately two weeks before recovery, likely less: bodily decomposition was minor, particularly considering exposure to the elements.


[Document #477-847a: MST-Zulu-43 Investigation.]

[Document #478-847b: RPC-847-B1 Testing (Excerpts).]

[Document #479-847c: MH370 Flight Recorder Data.]

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